Welcome to SuperDARN!
SuperDARN stands for Super Dual Auroral Radar Network. The network consists of more than 30 low-power HF radars that look into Earth's upper atmosphere beginning at mid-latitudes and extending into the polar regions. The radars operate continuously and observe the motion of charged particles (plasma) in the ionosphere and other effects that provide scientists with information on Earth's space environment. The knowledge gained from this work provides insight into space weather hazards including radiation exposure for high-altitude travelers and disruptions to communication networks, navigation systems (GPS), and electrical power grids.

The SuperDARN Research Group at Virginia Tech (VT) collaborates with an international community of scientists and engineers to operate radars and share data. The VT Group operates five radars. For a summary of the radars and their affiliations, visit the Radar Maps/Tables/Links web page.

U.S. SuperDARN Collaboration
The U.S. component of SuperDARN is funded by the National Science Foundation under the Space Weather Research (SWR) Program as a collaboration between Virginia Tech (lead institution), Dartmouth College, University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). Click logos for access to the web sites of the U.S. SuperDARN partners.



Dr. Philip Erickson and Dr. Anthea Coster from MIT Haystack Observatory will be visiting with the Virginia Tech SuperDARN HF radar group and Space@VT from Monday, March 20 until Wednesday, March 22. Please contact Mike or Wayne if you would like to arrange a time to meet with Phil or Anthea.

On Monday Phil will present an IGEP seminar in Remote Sensing entitled

'Sensing Earth's Ionosphere with Really Large Radars: How and Why'
Monday, 12:20 - 1:10 pm
Fralin Auditorium

Click 'Read More' to view Phil's abstract for the seminar.

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Web site open for the 2017 SuperDARN Workshop in Tuscany, Italy, June 4-9, 2017

By: miker  on: Tue., Jan. 24, 2017 04:34 PM EST  (428 Reads)
Dr. Federica Marcucci has announced that the web site is open for the 2017 SuperDARN Workshop which will be held at Palazzo Chigi Zondadari in San Quirico D'Orcia (SI) - Italy, June 4-9, 2017. The meeting will be hosted by the the Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology (IAPS) of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF). The link is http://www.iaps.inaf.it/sz/SD2017/(external link)

Abstract deadline: April 14, 2017
Early Registration deadline: April 28, 2017
Note: On the registration form in the field for 'Vat Number' non-EU members enter 'N/A'

Photo: A panorama of the walled town of San Quirico D'Orcia

ISEE / Nagoya University hosts meeting of SuperDARN mid-latitude researchers, January 10-14, 2017

By: miker  on: Thu., Jan. 12, 2017 12:19 AM EST  (425 Reads)
Dr. Nozomu Nishitani of the Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research (ISEE) of Nagoya University hosted a workshop to review the accomplishments of the mid-latitude component of the SuperDARN network. The participants include the PIs of current and future mid-latitude radars and specialists in the research that is enabled by mid-latitude radar observations. Just more than ten years have passed since the first radars specifically purposed as mid-latitude instruments came on the air at NASA Wallops Space Flight Center in Virginia (2005) and at Rikubetsu Observatory in Hokkaido (2006). The workshop was made possible by an award from the ISEE Center for International Collaborative Research (CICR): http://cicr.isee.nagoya-u.ac.jp/index_e.html(external link)

Photo credit: Dr. Pasha Ponomarenko (U. Saskatchewan) and Ms. Yoko Tanaka (ISEE)
The Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) satellite mission got underway on December 20, 2016 with the launch of an Epsilon rocket from the Uchinoura Space Center on the southern Japanese island of Kyushu. The aim of the mission is to study Earth's radiation belts. Coordinated operations are planned with the SuperDARN radars. Shortly after launch the satellite was officially nicknamed "ARASE", which is a Japanese word for a river raging with rough water and also the name of a river close to the Uchinoura Space Center. A news article about ARASE that features an interview with SuperDARN PI Nagatsuma-san is available from the NHK World service at
https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/videos/20161221173156838/(external link)

Photo credit: Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

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Fort Hays Reflector Wire Repair Trip, Feb. 2017

By: ksterne  on: Mon., Feb. 27, 2017 01:38 PM EST  (131 Reads)
Hays, KS sustained a major freezing rain and icing event in mid-January 2017. Following reports from FHSU student intern, Brett Chrisler, of significant damage to the West main antenna array a trip was made by engineer Kevin Sterne to assess the damage at the radar site. As well, this trip would be allow for preparations to be made for a future repair trip.

Blackstone Trip, Nov. 2016

By: ksterne  on: Mon., Nov. 07, 2016 03:34 PM EST  (1138 Reads)
After many, many years, the grounding work along the antenna poles had not been completed. On each antenna pole, a ground rod had been driven into the ground and a copper busbar had been attached under one of the bolts on the base of the pole. So a trip was made to the site by Kevin Sterne, Shibaji Chakraborty and Muhammad Rafiq to complete the grounding work.

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