Welcome to SuperDARN!
SuperDARN stands for Super Dual Auroral Radar Network. The network consists of more than 30 low-power HF radars that look into Earth's upper atmosphere beginning at mid-latitudes and extending into the polar regions. The radars operate continuously and observe the motion of charged particles (plasma) in the ionosphere and other effects that provide scientists with information on Earth's space environment. The knowledge gained from this work provides insight into space weather hazards including radiation exposure for high-altitude travelers and disruptions to communication networks, navigation systems (GPS), and electrical power grids.

The SuperDARN Research Group at Virginia Tech (VT) collaborates with an international community of scientists and engineers to operate radars and share data. The VT Group operates five radars. For a summary of the radars and their affiliations, visit the Radar Maps/Tables/Links web page.

U.S. SuperDARN Collaboration
The U.S. component of SuperDARN is funded by the National Science Foundation under the Space Weather Research (SWR) Program as a collaboration between Virginia Tech (lead institution), Dartmouth College, University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). Click logos for access to the web sites of the U.S. SuperDARN partners.




VT SuperDARN Servers and Website brought down by Security Breach, service is now restored

By: miker  on: Fri., Nov. 10, 2017 11:32 AM EST  (175 Reads)
Update Dec. 6, 2017

With the restoration of davitpy's sftp server, the servers are now fully functional. Please send any continuing problems with accessing our servers to Kevin Sterne

SuperDARN scientist Suzie Imber wins UK Astronaut contest

By: miker  on: Mon., Oct. 02, 2017 12:39 PM EDT  (344 Reads)
Prof. Mark Lester has passed on the exciting news that Dr. Suzie Imber from Leicester University has won a BBC-sponsored contest entitled 'Astronauts: Do you have what it takes?' to receive a reference from NASA Astronaut Commander Chris Hadfield to be accepted into the ESA astronaut training program. Suzie is a graduate of Leicester University where she was advised by Prof. Steve Milan. She has worked as a Research Scientist at NASA GSFC and is currently Associate Professor at Leicester. Mark has passed on the following notes:

"Suzie Imber, who has made several contributions to the SuperDARN group, was selected as one of 12 contestants from an original pool of applicants of well in the thousands and reached the last 3 of the competition. In the final episode of the series it was announced that Suzie had won the competition. Many congratulations to Suzie!" Also see

http://www2.le.ac.uk/news/blog/2017-archive/september/leicester-space-scientist-proves-she-has-what-it-takes-to-become-an-astronaut(external link)
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Web page for ERG (ARASE) mission now available

By: miker  on: Sun., July 30, 2017 05:14 PM EDT  (2063 Reads)
Yoshi Miyoshi (Arase/ERG Project Scientist) announced on July 31, 2017 that a web page for Arase quick-look data is now available. Click on *Read More* for details.
The ERG (Arase) satellite has now been in full operation since March 24.

The Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) satellite mission was launched on December 20, 2016 with an Epsilon rocket from the Uchinoura Space Center on the southern Japanese island of Kyushu. The aim of the mission is to study Earth's radiation belts. Coordinated operations are planned with the SuperDARN radars. Shortly after launch the satellite was officially nicknamed "Arase", which is a Japanese word for a river raging with rough water and also the name of a river close to the Uchinoura Space Center.

Photo credit: Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

Read All SuperDARN News Articles.

Fort Hays Reflector Rebuild Trip Part 2, Aug. 2017

By: ksterne  on: Wed., Oct. 04, 2017 11:16 AM EDT  (444 Reads)
Following the May 2017 trip, the west main reflector array still needed to be rebuilt with a little over half of the wires still needing to be strung up. This trip would also serve as the last tune up of the radar prior to the Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017.

Fort Hays Reflector Rebuild Trip, May 2017

By: ksterne  on: Tue., Oct. 03, 2017 04:06 PM EDT  (326 Reads)
Following an ice storm in January 2017 and an assessment trip in Feb. 2017 a major trip was made to make repairs to the West main antenna array reflector so that the west radar was fully functional well prior to the August 2017 solar eclipse.

Read All SuperDARN Technical News Articles.


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